The Best Low Carb Protein Shake

What is the best low carb protein shake?

drink wholesome is the best low carb protein shake. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

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$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

drink wholesome is the best low carb protein shake.

Most protein shakes contain a few carbohydrates, which is normal and in most cases a good thing. Let me explain why.

Carbohydrates (carbs) and proteins are two of three main types of macronutrients in food. Most foods contain both in different amounts. Some foods, like rice and wheat, are naturally high in carbs and low in protein. Others, like eggs and legumes, are high in protein and low in carbs. The latter are used to make protein supplements, which makes sense because protein supplements are supposed to help you boost their protein intake, not your carbohydrate intake. Most protein supplement manufacturers do not simply use dietary proteins to make their products, however. They actually process the proteins to remove the carbohydrates, fats, and other nutrients. What is left is something called a protein concentrate or isolate.* For someone looking to boost his or her protein intake, this sounds like a good thing. For someone looking to eat natural food, however, it does not.

I will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like nature. There are a number of reasons why this is concerning. Keep reading to learn more. 

Protein concentrates and isolates have been stripped of the nutrients that make food taste good. They therefore taste like chalk. In order to mask the chalkiness, manufacturers use food additives. This is why the average protein supplement contains 10+ ingredients. It is also why protein supplements are so hard to digest.

Before I get into why food additives are bad for your gut, I need to explain the difference between ready-to-drink protein shakes and protein shakes made with protein powder. Ready-to-drink protein shakes, as the name implies, can be consumed with zero preparation. In order to make a protein shake with protein powder, you have to mix the powder with milk or water. This requires a blender or a shaker bottle, and a little extra time and effort. Some people prefer ready-to-drink protein shakes because they are more convenient, but if they knew what they were drinking, they would probably vomit. 

Ready-to-drink protein shakes are full of food additives like emulsifiers, stabilizers, and thickeners. Ingredients like these are required for shelf stability (to prevent the shake from spoiling on the shelf). This is why I highly recommend that you make your own protein shakes with protein powder. That said, not all protein powders are created equal, and many also contain lots of additives. Keep reading to learn how to pick an easy to digest protein powder.  

*Protein concentrates and isolates are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Again, most protein supplements are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon) and can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems, widespread inflammation, and permanent damage to the gut microbiome. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein supplements:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carob bean gum, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying low carb protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids, Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Why drink wholesome

Our dairy-free protein powders do contain a few carbohydrates, roughly 4 net grams per serving, which is a good news for your gut. Because we do not use protein concentrates or isolates, we do not need to use food additives. This means that drink wholesome is perfect for people with gut issues and sensitive stomachs, as well as for people just looking to boost their protein intake without the added junk. If you are looking for truly low carb, try our unflavored protein powder, which is made with pasteurized egg whites and contains only 1 gram of carbohydrates per serving.

Again, drink wholesome makes the best low carb protein shakes. If you suffer from Candidiasis, Crohn’s, diverticulitis, gastritis, gastroparesis, GERD, leaky gut, IBS, IBD, SIBO, or ulcerative colitis, you have come to the right place. Our protein powders are made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome is the best low carb protein shake


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

How To Make Protein Shakes Thicker

Wondering how to make protein shakes thicker?

Wondering how to make protein shakes thicker? Keep reading for a few easy tricks to make your protein shake thick and creamy.

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$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

How to make your protein shake thicker

First of all, there are two types of protein shakes: ready-to-drink (store-bought) protein shakes, and protein shakes made with protein powder. In order to make a protein shake with protein powder, you have to mix the powder with milk or water. This requires a blender or a shaker bottle.

If you prefer thick protein shakes, I recommend making your own protein shakes with protein powder. This way you can adjust the recipe until you achieve the desired thickness. Below are a few tricks that will quickly turn watery shakes into thick, creamy perfection. Please note that most of these tricks require a blender.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

6 easy ways to make a thick protein shake 

Use less liquid.

The less liquid you use, the thicker your protein shake will be.

Use milk. 

If you prefer thick protein shakes, use milk instead of water. Any type of milk will do the trick, but if you want a milkshake consistency, I recommend using coconut milk.

Add ice. 

If you are using a blender, adding a handful of ice cubes is an easy way to make your protein shake thicker. I find that 5 medium sized cubes is the perfect number. Keep in mind that blended ice melts quickly, so if you do not drink your shake right away, ice will just make it more watery.

Add avocado or banana.

If you are using a blender, adding avocado or banana, especially frozen avocado or banana, is an easy way to make your protein shake thicker. I always keep a few bananas in my freezer for this reason.

Add nut butter.

If you are using a blender, adding a spoonful of nut butter is an easy way to make your protein shake thicker. I like to use creamy peanut butter.

Add chia seeds.

1-2 tablespoons of chia seeds will instantly thicken up a protein shake. Keep in mind that chia seeds will also change the consistency of your shake, however, so this trick might not be for everyone.

DO NOT ADD GUMS

Some people recommend using xanthan or guar gum to thicken a protein shake. I DO NOT recommend doing this. Xanthan and guar gum are popular food additives found in many protein powders and ready-to-drink protein shakes. They can certainly help thicken your shake, but they can also cause uncomfortable side effects. Keep reading to learn more.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon) and can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carob bean gum, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. 

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids, Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Why drink wholesome

Sick of watery protein shakes? Switch to drink wholesome. Our protein powders make thick protein shakes every time because we use minimally-processed ingredients. Most protein powders, on the other hand, are made with heavily-processed protein isolates.* Protein isolates have been stripped of everything but the protein, meaning they contain virtually zero fats or carbohydrates. Fats and carbohydrates are what make protein shakes thick, and without them you can expect a watery protein boost. This is also why most protein powders contain food additives. Ingredients like xanthan gum and sunflower lecithin are added to replace the fats and carbohydrates removed during processing. 

*Protein isolates are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

How to make protein shakes thicker.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

How To Avoid Foam In Protein Shake

Wondering how to avoid foam in protein shake?

Wondering how to avoid foam in protein shake? You have come to the right place. Here are a few easy tips on how to avoid foam in protein shake. 

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$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

How to avoid foam in protein shake.

Why is there foam in my protein shake? 

Protein powder has a tendency to foam when hydrated and mixed, which some people do not like. Here are 3 factors that affect the formation of foam in protein shakes.  

Air 

Mixing adds air to the protein, which causes it to denature (change shape). The water-loving parts of the protein stay in the water, and the water-fearing parts stick out in the air. These rearranged proteins then bond with each other, creating a network that traps air bubbles and holds them in place. The result is foam.

Heat

Temperature can also affect the formation of foam. Protein shakes mixed with warm liquid, for example, foam more easily than protein shakes mixed with cold liquid. This is because heat increases kinetic energy, which causes proteins to denature more quickly.

Stabilizers

Stabilizers like sunflower lecithin and xanthan gum are a third reason why protein shakes foam. Most protein powders contain one or more stabilizers, which are added to improve characteristics like shelf stability and mixability. These food additives also facilitate the formation of foam, an unintended effect that occurs because stabilizers are surfactants, reducing surface tension and making it easier for bubbles to form.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

How to make a protein shake without foam.

Foam, whether it is light and airy or frothy and dense, gets in the way. Use the following tricks to get rid of protein shake foam once and for all.

Add fat. 

Even a small amount of fat interferes with the formation of foam. Fats weaken the bonds that hold the air bubbles in place, causing them to collapse more easily. Good sources of fat to add to your protein shake include nut butter, avocado, and coconut oil. 

Mix slowly, use cold liquid. 

If you use a shaker bottle, shake gently. If you have a blender, use the slowest setting. Finally, use cold milk or water, the colder the better.

Avoid food additives. 

Again, most protein powders contain stabilizers, which facilitate the formation of foam. Choosing a protein powder without stabilizers will solve most of your foaming problems. Here are a few of the most common stabilizers used in protein supplements:

acacia gum, carob bean gum, carrageenan, cellulose gum, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, soy lecithin, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. 

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Why drink wholesome

First of all, we add coconut to our protein powders to reduce foaming. Coconut is naturally high in healthy fats, known as medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), which stop foam from forming. Second, our protein powders are stabilizer-free. We do not use food additives of any kind, which helps keep foaming to a minimum.

Sick of protein powder foam? Switch to drink wholesome. It does not foam because it is full of healthy fats and additive-free. Order samples to see for yourself.

How to prevent foam in protein shakes.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Protein Powder Without Stevia

What is the best protein powder without stevia?

drink wholesome is the best protein powder without stevia. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients and sweetened with monk fruit. Order samples to see for yourself.

$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%
$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

drink wholesome is the best protein powder without stevia.

Sick of stevia protein powder? 

It is almost impossible to find a natural protein powder without stevia these days. Stevia is an inexpensive zero calorie sweetener derived from the stevia rebaudiana plant. It is over 100 times sweeter than table sugar, and is considered by many to be a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners like sucralose. It is therefore no surprise that this zero calorie sweetener has found its way into protein powders looking to please health conscious consumers. That said, more and more people are starting to avoid stevia. Keep reading to learn more. 

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Why should you avoid stevia?

First of all, although it is sweet, stevia has an unpleasant bitter aftertaste that can linger in your mouth for hours. This is because stevia, unlike sugar, activates bitter taste receptors in addition to sweet taste receptors. These bitter receptors can ruin your smoothies or whatever you add your protein powder to. 

Another reason to avoid stevia has to do with how it is made. Stevia is often extracted from the stevia rebaudiana plant using chemicals like ethanol and methyl alcohol. This, one could argue, makes it barely more natural than the artificial sweeteners that it seeks to replace. In fact, a recent class action lawsuit filed in California reached a $6.1 million settlement because it was ruled that the company in question falsely labeled and advertised its stevia sweeteners as natural. 

For those of you with gut issues and sensitive stomachs, you may be wondering if stevia is gut-friendly. The answer is probably. In a review of 14 studies, researchers found that only 4 of the 14 showed that stevia is harmful to gut microbiota. That said, many protein powders containing stevia also contain sugar alcohols like erythritol, which can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating and diarrhea. Why sugar alcohols? Because since stevia is 200+ times sweeter than sugar, it is hard to use. Sugar alcohols are therefore added to provide volume and texture, making stevia more like sugar and easier to work with.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

If not stevia, then what do you use?

Instead of artificial sweeteners or stevia, we use a natural sweetener called monk fruit. Monk fruit – also known as luo han guo – is a melon-like fruit native to Southeast Asia. Monk fruit sweetener is created by removing the seeds and skin of the fruit, crushing the fruit, and collecting the juice, which is then dried into a concentrated powder. As far as low/zero calorie sweeteners go, monk fruit is the most natural and best tasting. When used in moderation, it tastes just like sugar. 

Given that monk fruit sweetener has only been commercially available for about a decade, its impact on, and association with, chronic diseases like obesity and diabetes has not been well documented. That said, it has been safely used in Asian cuisine for centuries and has no known side effects, even when consumed in large quantities. Moreover, small randomized trials have shown that monk fruit sweetener does not negatively impact blood sugar or insulin levels. For this reason, as well as those outlined above, we believe that monk fruit is the best available sweetener for our protein powders.

Why drink wholesome

Our protein powders are stevia-free, additive-free, dairy-free, and made with real foods, not protein isolates. They are perfect for people with gut issues and sensitive stomachs, as well as for people just looking to boost their protein intake without the processing and added junk.

Again, drink wholesome is the best protein powder without stevia. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients and sweetened with monk fruit. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome is the best stevia-free protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best High Calorie Protein Powder

The Best High Calorie Protein Powder

drink wholesome is the best high calorie protein powder. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%
$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

drink wholesome is the best high calorie protein powder.

Why high calorie? 

Although protein powder is often championed as a weight loss food, it can also help you gain weight. This is because protein shakes are an easy way to add calories and protein to your diet. Gaining weight is all about maintaining a calorie surplus – consuming more calories than you burn. It takes an extra 3,500 calories to gain a pound, and to gain weight at a safe rate – 0.5 pound per week – you will need to consume an extra 1,750 calories weekly, or an extra 250 calories daily. Adding a protein shake to your diet can help you get these extra calories. 

People like protein shakes, as opposed to other high protein foods, because it is easier to drink your calories than it is to chew them. It is also easier to make a protein shake than it is to cook a meal. For someone who has trouble eating enough, a drinkable meal can be a lifesaver. If protein shakes are not your thing, you can also add protein powder to oatmeal, yogurt, and your favorite recipes. This is a great way to add calories and protein to your diet.

Why drink wholesome

We make egg white and almond-based protein powders. Although the number of calories varies by flavor, some of our protein powders have 20 grams of protein and 170+ calories per serving. For reference, Orgain and Vega, the two most popular brands of vegan protein powder on Amazon, have only 150 calories per serving. We also make meal replacement powders that have 30 grams of protein and 250+ calories per serving.

Why do our protein powders have more calories? 

Unlike most protein powder companies, we use real food ingredients, not protein isolates. Protein isolates are foods chemically or mechanically stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.” Unlike real foods, protein isolates are missing the nutrients that contribute most of the calories. If you are looking for a protein boost and nothing else, protein isolates are great. If you are looking for something that is nutritionally balanced, however, they are not.

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use real food ingredients like egg whites, almonds, and coconut. Egg whites are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. Almonds are just roasted, pressed, and ground. Unlike protein isolates, they still contain fats and carbohydrates, and therefore lots of calories.

Real foods are not only more nutritious, but they also taste better. Fats and carbohydrates are the nutrients that make food taste good, and because most protein powders don’t have any, they taste like chalk. Moreover, in order to mask the chalkiness, protein manufacturers use additives like xanthan gum and sunflower lecithin. Ingredients like these are not good for you, and can cause uncomfortable side effects. Keep reading to learn more.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Again, most protein powders are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon) and can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems, widespread inflammation, and permanent damage to the gut microbiome. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying the highest calorie protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? As we discussed earlier, most protein powders are made with protein isolates. We will not go into the details, but protein isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. The problem with ingredients that look nothing like real food is that they are hard to digest; your gut always prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Again, instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and almonds. Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for your gut. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our almond protein powder. Unlike protein concentrates or isolates, almonds contain lots of healthy fats, fiber, and other nutrients like calcium and vitamin E. We prefer almonds to other minimally-processed plant protein sources because they are more gut-friendly. Research suggests that almonds can improve the diversity and composition of the gut microbiome. Research also suggests that almonds possess prebiotic properties, meaning they stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Still on the fence? 

Our protein powders are additive-free, dairy-free, and made with real foods, not protein isolates. They are perfect for people with gut issues and sensitive stomachs, as well as for people just looking to boost their calorie and protein intake without the processing and added junk.

drink wholesome is the best high calorie protein powder. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome is the best high calorie protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

Protein Bar Vs Protein Shake

Protein bar vs protein shake? 

Protein bar vs protein shake. Learn more about how to best boost your protein intake and achieve your wellness goals.

protein bar vs protein shake

Protein bars vs protein shakes.

What is a protein bar? 

Protein bars are a high protein snack designed to help people boost their protein intake. Many people enjoy protein bars because they are convenient. You can eat a protein powder pretty much anywhere at any time, and doing so requires no cooking or cleanup. The average protein bar contains 10–20 grams of protein. 

What is a protein shake? 

A protein shake is a high protein drink designed to help people boost their protein intake. There are two types of protein shakes, ready-to-drink (store-bought) protein shakes, and protein shakes made with protein powder. In order to make a protein shake with protein powder, you have to mix the powder with milk or water. This requires a blender or a shake bottle, and a little extra time and effort. The average protein shake contains 20-30 grams of protein. 

Protein bar vs shake.

Protein bars and shakes are basically two different forms of the same thing: a protein supplement. That said, there are a few differences between the two.

Cost. 

Per gram of protein, protein shakes tend to be cheaper than protein bars.

Nutrition. 

Protein shakes typically contain more protein than protein bars. They also contain less sugar and fewer calories, which is not necessarily an advantage, but it could be.

Convenience.

In terms of convenience, there is no virtually difference between store-bought protein bars and store-bought protein shakes. When it comes to making protein supplements at home, however, there is a huge difference. Homemade protein bars take at least an hour to make because they need to be refrigerated. Homemade protein shakes, on the other hand, can be made in just seconds if you have a good blender.

Use. 

It is easier to swallow your food than it is to chew it. For someone who has trouble eating solid food, this is a good reason to choose protein shakes over protein bars.

Digestibility.

It is easier to digest food in liquid form, so if you have gut issues or a sensitive stomach, protein shakes are a better choice than protein bars.

Portability. 

Protein bars do have one distinct advantage over protein shakes: they are easier to transport. A protein bar is far lighter than a protein shake, and takes up less space in your bag, car, etc. That said, if you were looking to stock up on protein supplements, buying protein powder is the way to go. You can pack far more protein in your pantry in the form of powder than in the form of bars.

Do your own research. 

Considering variables like cost, nutrition, convenience, consumption, digestibility, and portability, protein shakes are the clear winner in my book. This is not to say that protein bars are a waste of money, it is just that if I were to choose one over the other, I would choose protein shakes every time.

Given the wide variety of protein bars and shakes on the market, it is important to know that not all protein supplements are created equal. Unfortunately, many store-bought protein bars and shakes are full of food additives, heavily-processed ingredients known to cause uncomfortable side effects. This is why I recommend that you make your own protein shakes with protein powder. Unfortunately, however, many protein powders also contain food additives. You will therefore have to read ingredient lists to find the good ones. Keep reading to learn more about the top ingredients to avoid when buying protein supplements.  

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Again, many protein bars, shakes, and protein powders are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you eat a protein bar or drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon) and can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems, widespread inflammation, and permanent damage to the gut microbiome. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein supplement trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein supplements:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying a protein supplement, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein supplement is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein supplement made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein supplements are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.” We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein supplement. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. The problem with ingredients that look nothing like real food is that they are hard to digest; your gut always prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Instead of using protein concentrates or isolates, we make protein powders with egg whites and almonds. Egg whites are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. Almonds are just roasted, pressed, and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are an easy to digest, gut-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for your gut. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our almond protein powder. Unlike protein concentrates or isolates, almonds contain lots of healthy fats, fiber, and other nutrients like calcium and vitamin E. We prefer almonds to other minimally-processed plant protein sources because they are more gut-friendly. Research suggests that almonds can improve the diversity and composition of the gut microbiome. Research also suggests that almonds possess prebiotic properties, meaning they stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Protein shake vs protein bar? Protein shakes are hands down better than protein bars, and making homemade protein shakes with protein powder is the best way boost your protein intake. Looking for a healthy protein powder? Try drink wholesome. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. 

Protein bar vs protein shake. 


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Protein Powder With Caffeine

What is the best protein powder with caffeine?

drink wholesome is the best protein powder with caffeine. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%
mocha protein powder

drink wholesome is the best protein powder with caffeine.

Does protein powder contain caffeine? 

Although some protein powders contain added caffeine, most do not. A few protein powders are naturally caffeinated, however. Our mocha protein powder, for example, is naturally caffeinated because it contains spray dried coffee. It might not have as much caffeine as a cup of coffee, but it definitely help you wake up in the morning.

For people who do not have enough time for a smoothie and a cup of coffee, a caffeinated protein shake is the perfect breakfast. It is convenient, nutritious, and will jumpstart your day. Moreover, adding protein to your breakfast is a great idea. Dietary protein is the most satiating macronutrient, which means that eating lots of it at breakfast will keep you from snacking and overeating later in the day. 

Why drink wholesome?

Any type of protein powder can help you meet your protein goals, but not all protein powders are good for you. One look at the ingredient list will explain why; most protein powders are made with heavily-processed ingredients that look nothing like real food. This not only makes them hard to digest, but can also cause uncomfortable side effects. This is where drink wholesome sets itself apart from other protein supplements. We use simple, easy to digest ingredients, and list them on the front of the package so you know exactly what you are putting into your body. Keep reading to learn more about what to look for, and what to avoid buying protein powder. 

mocha protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems and widespread inflammation. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying caffeine protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, coffee, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.” We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. The problem with ingredients that look nothing like real food is that they are hard to digest; your gut always prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation.

vegan chocolate protein powder
mocha protein powder

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and almonds. Egg whites are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. Almonds are just roasted, pressed, and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are an easy to digest, gut-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our almond protein powder. Unlike protein concentrates or isolates, almonds contain lots of healthy fats, fiber, and other nutrients like calcium and vitamin E. We prefer almonds to other minimally-processed plant protein sources because they are more gut-friendly. Research suggests that almonds can improve the diversity and composition of the gut microbiome. Research also suggests that almonds possess prebiotic properties, meaning they stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best protein powder with caffeine. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome is the best protein powder with caffeine.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Low Histamine Protein Powder

What is the best low histamine protein powder?

drink wholesome is the best low histamine protein powder. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%
$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

drink wholesome is the best low histamine protein powder.

What are histamines? 

Histamines are chemicals that act as neurotransmitters (chemical messengers), trigger the release of stomach acid to help with digestion, and cause inflammation as part of a local immune response.

What is histamine intolerance ? 

Histamine intolerance is a disorder associated with an impaired ability to metabolize (break down) histamine. Histamine is produced by the body and taken in from food. In healthy individuals, enzymes break down histamine, but sometimes this activity is impaired, which causes histamine to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of histamine can cause headaches, nasal congestion, fatigue, hives, and digestive issues.

Common causes of histamine intolerance include: 1) medications or foods that inhibit enzyme function or production 2) foods that trigger histamine release and 3) gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBS), leaky gut syndrome, and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Research is starting to suggest that a disrupted gut microbiome may be a significant driver behind histamine intolerance. Gastrointestinal disorders (G) like IBS, leaky gut, and SIBO cause significant inflammation in the gut, which may impair enzyme function and production. Research also suggests that gut inflammation can cause excessive histamine production. Excessive production, paired with impaired enzyme activity can lead to increased histamine absorption and accumulation in the bloodstream. In other words, the inflammation resulting from a disrupted gut microbiome may be the main cause of histamine intolerance.

What is the low histamine diet? 

The low histamine diet aims to reduce the symptoms of histamine intolerance by avoiding histamine-rich and histamine-releasing foods. Research has shown that reducing histamine-rich foods in the diet dramatically reduces symptoms. Foods high in histamine include things like alcohol and other fermented beverages, dairy products, processed and fried foods, and food additives. Histamine-releasing foods include things like pineapple, shellfish, and tomatoes.

The low-histamine diet is not a histamine intolerance treatment, but rather a temporary band-aid for symptom relief. This is why addressing the underlying causes of histamine intolerance, one of which may be GI disorders like IBS, leaky gut, and SIBO, is so important. Moreover, because each of these conditions can be managed through diet, picking the right protein powder can make all the difference.

Why drink wholesome?

Our protein powders are made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Our vanilla protein powder, for example, is made with egg whites, coconut, vanilla, and monk fruit. Our vegan vanilla protein powder, is made with almonds, coconut, vanilla, and monk fruit. Ingredients like these are low histamine and generally well-tolerated by patients with histamine-related issues. The main reason why drink wholesome is the best protein powder for someone with histamine intolerance, however, is that it is gut-friendly. Given the connection between the gut microbiome and histamine absorption, finding a protein powder that is easy to digest is crucial if you are struggling with histamine intolerance.

Your average protein powder, on the other hand, is NOT gut-friendly because it is made with ingredients that look nothing like real food. Keep reading to learn more about how what you eat affects your gut health, and what ingredients avoid when buying protein powder.

Disclaimer: Every person has unique dietary triggers, and some people with histamine intolerance are not able to tolerate egg whites and almonds. Order samples to see if our protein powders are right for you.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems and widespread inflammation. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder for sensitive stomachs, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.” We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and almonds. Egg whites are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. Almonds are just roasted, pressed, and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach and gut-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our almond protein powder. Unlike protein concentrates or isolates, almonds contain lots of healthy fats, fiber, and other nutrients like calcium and vitamin E. We prefer almonds to other minimally-processed plant protein sources because they are more gut-friendly. Research suggests that almonds can improve the diversity and composition of the gut microbiome. Research also suggests that almonds possess prebiotic properties, meaning they stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best protein powder for histamine intolerance. It is made with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome is the best low histamine protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Protein Shakes For Picky Eaters

What are the best protein shakes for picky eaters?

What are the best protein shakes for picky eaters? drink wholesome makes the best protein shakes for picky eaters with simple, easy to digest ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%
$34.99 or subscribe and save up to 15%

drink wholesome makes the best protein shakes for picky eaters. 

What is picky eating?

Do you know a picky eater? Picky eating is when a child (or adult) refuses to eat certain foods or groups of foods. Parents of picky eaters often worry that their child is not getting the nutrition that he or she needs to grow and develop, but research suggests that this may not be the case. That said, in some cases, picky eating can lead to malnutrition, which can affect growth and development. One study found that picky eating in preschool children resulted in significant detrimental impacts on growth, nutritional status, development, physical activity, and health status. 

Among the nutrients that parents of picky eaters are most concerned about is protein. Protein is essential for growth and development as it is found in every cell of the body, serving as one of the building blocks of muscles, skin, and bones. Protein is also a key component of antibodies that protect the body against illness. Needless to say, getting enough of it is crucial for everyone.

Why protein shakes?

If you are concerned that your child is suffering from a protein deficiency, I recommend that you consult a pediatrician. If you are just looking for a quick and easy way to get more protein into your kid’s diet, however, then a protein shake is a great place to start. Results of a randomized, controlled study show that daily oral nutritional supplements promote catch-up growth in young picky eaters who are at risk for malnutrition. 

It is worth mentioning that although picky eating is most common in young children, it also affects adults. The elderly are partially susceptible to increased picky eating or food selectivity, which research correlates with an increased risk for malnutrition. If you are a parent, caregiver, or a picky eater yourself, adding protein shakes to the menu might be a great idea. A quality protein shake is convenient, nutritious, and has a pleasant smell, taste, and texture.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Which protein shake is best for picky eaters? 

There are two types of protein shakes, ready-to-drink (store-bought) protein shakes, and protein shakes made with protein powder. In order to make a protein shake with protein powder, you have to mix the powder with milk or water. This requires a blender or a shake bottle, and a little extra time and effort. Some people buy ready-to-drink protein shakes instead of protein powder because they value convenience, but if they knew what they were drinking, they would probably vomit. 

Ready-to-drink protein shakes are full of food additives like emulsifiers, stabilizers, and thickeners. Ingredients like these help with shelf stability (sitting on the shelf for a long time without spoiling), and can replicate the creamy, dairy-like mouthfeel that people crave. Although this sounds like a good thing, food additives look nothing like real food and can cause a number of side effects. This is why I recommend that you make your own protein shakes with protein powder. Unfortunately, however, not all protein powders are created equal, and many contain the same additives found in ready-to-drink protein shakes. You will therefore have to read ingredient lists to find the good ones. Keep reading to learn more about the top ingredients to avoid when buying protein powder.  

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Again, most ready-to drink protein shakes and many protein powders are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems and widespread inflammation. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.” We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and almonds. Egg whites are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. Almonds are just roasted, pressed, and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach and gut-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our almond protein powder. Unlike protein concentrates or isolates, almonds contain lots of healthy fats, fiber, and other nutrients like calcium and vitamin E. We prefer almonds to other minimally-processed plant protein sources because they are more gut-friendly. Research suggests that almonds can improve the diversity and composition of the gut microbiome. Research also suggests that almonds possess prebiotic properties, meaning they stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome makes the best protein shakes for picky eaters with stomach and gut-friendly ingredients. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome makes the best protein shakes for picky eaters. 


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

Do Protein Shakes Make You Gain Weight Without Working Out?

Do protein shakes make you gain weight without working out?

Do protein shakes make you gain weight without working out? Learn more about how to use protein shakes to achieve your wellness goals.

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Protein shakes can make you gain weight without working out. 

The paradox. 

Although protein shakes are often championed as a weight loss food, they can also help you gain weight. This may seem paradoxical, but it makes perfect sense because depending on how they are used, protein shakes can help you achieve a calorie deficit or a calorie surplus.

Losing weight is all about achieving and maintaining a calorie deficit – eating fewer calories than you burn. It takes an extra 3,500 calories to gain a pound, and to gain weight at a safe rate – 0.5 pound per week – you will need to eat an extra 1,750 calories weekly, or 250 calories daily. Adding a protein shake to your diet is an easy way to eat an extra 250 calories because it is easier to drink your calories than it is to chew them.

Gaining weight is all about achieving and maintaining a calorie surplus – eating more calories than you burn. You have to burn 3,500 more calories to eat to lose a pound, and to lose weight at a safe rate – 0.5 pound per week – you will need to eat 1,750 fewer calories weekly, or 250 calories daily. Replacing a meal or part of a meal with a protein shake can help you eat less. This works because high protein foods are among the most satiating foods. They keep you feeling full for longer, which helps prevent cravings and overeating. In other words, increasing the percentage of your calories that come from high protein foods can help you lose weight. 

So, do protein shakes make you gain weight without working out? Protein shakes can make you gain weight without working out as long as they help you achieve and maintain a calorie surplus.

What about muscle?

If you are not only looking to gain weight, but also looking to gain muscle mass, then you have to work out. Essentially, muscle growth can occur only if muscle protein synthesis exceeds muscle protein breakdown. This is called positive muscle protein balance, and is regulated by two mechanisms : amino acid availability and resistance exercise. 

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. There are 20 of them, 9 of which are essential and must come from food. Resistance exercise is the use of resistance to muscular contraction to build skeletal muscle mass. Both amino acid availability (dietary protein) and resistance exercise (strength or weight training) are required to build muscle, and if one of the two is absent, muscle building cannot occur. This is why you have to “work out” in order to gain muscle mass. I used quotation marks because working out does not necessarily mean going to the gym. Daily activities like walking and vacuuming can also help you build muscle. 

What happens if you drink protein shakes without working out? Again, if drinking protein shakes helps you achieve and maintain a calorie deficit, you will lose weight, and if it helps you achieve and maintain a calorie surplus, you will gain weight. Whether or not protein shakes help you build muscle depends primarily on whether or not you work out. If you start drinking protein shakes but do not workout, do not expect to gain much muscle mass. 

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

How much protein? 

The current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight a day for sedentary adults. This amounts to about 56 grams per day for the average man, and about 46 grams for the average woman. These numbers can vary depending on a number of factors, however, including activity level, age, and health. People who regularly lift weights, for instance, may need as much as 1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. This means that a 150 pound person who does regular strength training may need to consume over 100 grams of protein each day! Getting this much protein from normal food can be challenging, especially if you are vegan or vegetarian, which is where protein shakes come in handy. 

Which protein shake is best? 

There are two types of protein shakes, ready-to-drink (store-bought) protein shakes, and protein shakes made with protein powder. In order to make a protein shake with protein powder, you have to mix the powder with milk or water. This requires a blender or a shake bottle, and a little extra time and effort. Some people buy ready-to-drink protein shakes instead of protein powder because they value convenience, but if they knew what they were drinking, they would probably vomit. 

Ready-to-drink protein shakes are full of food additives like emulsifiers, stabilizers, and thickeners. Ingredients like these help with shelf stability (sitting on the shelf for a long time without spoiling), and can replicate the creamy, dairy-like mouthfeel that people crave. Although this sounds like a good thing, food additives look nothing like real food and can cause a number of side effects. This is why I recommend that you make your own protein shakes with protein powder. Unfortunately, however, not all protein powders are created equal, and many contain the same additives found in ready-to-drink protein shakes. You will therefore have to read ingredient lists to find the good ones. Keep reading to learn more about the top ingredients to avoid when buying protein powder.  

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Again, most ready-to drink protein shakes and many protein powders are full of food additives. Although not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, additives can add up quickly (especially if you drink a protein shake every day) and cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects like bloating, constipation, diarrhea, gas, and stomach pain. This is because food additives are, generally speaking, hard to digest. They sit in your gut for longer than food should, which gives your gut bacteria more time to eat. As they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation.

In the long term, food additives can disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine, which can result in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. Artificial sweeteners are among the most harmful additives in the long term as they alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious, chronic GI problems and widespread inflammation. Some sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, are also poorly absorbed by the gut (meaning they feed those hungry gut bacteria) and cause diarrhea because they draw water into your intestine. Now you finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom!

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey and casein, which are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production, are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.” We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to isolate (separate) the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

vegan chocolate protein powder
chocolate protein powder

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and almonds. Egg whites are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. Almonds are just roasted, pressed, and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach and gut-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our almond protein powder. Unlike protein concentrates or isolates, almonds contain lots of healthy fats, fiber, and other nutrients like calcium and vitamin E. We prefer almonds to other minimally-processed plant protein sources because they are more gut-friendly. Research suggests that almonds can improve the diversity and composition of the gut microbiome. Research also suggests that almonds possess prebiotic properties, meaning they stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Can you drink protein shakes without working out? You absolutely can drink protein shakes without working out. Do protein shakes make you gain weight without working out? If drinking protein shakes helps you achieve and maintain a calorie surplus, then you will gain weight. Looking for a new protein shake? Try drink wholesome

Protein shakes can make you gain weight without working out. 


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.