Can Protein Powder Make You Depressed?

Can protein powder make you depressed?

Can protein powder make you depressed? No, protein powder itself cannot make you depressed. Learn more about protein powder.

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$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

Protein powder does not make you depressed.

You may have read that protein powder can cause depression. My advice is to stop reading. There is little to no clinical evidence to support this claim, so what you have read is little more than hearsay.  

Almost everyone who claims that protein powder can make you depressed cites the same study  conducted by the University of Sydney and published in Nature Metabolism. In this study, researchers examined the relationship between dietary branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and overall health. They found that long-term dietary BCAA manipulation influences healthspan and lifespan in mice. Yes, that was not a typo; this study involved three hundred and twelve male and female mice, not humans. The notion that protein powder can cause depression in humans is therefore an extrapolation of animal data to humans. Generally speaking, the assessment of human response from animal data is significantly limited, so using this study to make claims about human health is an overstatement. 

In order to really understand why it is a fallacy to use this study to argue that protein powder causes depression in humans, however, you first have to understand what BCAAs are. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are a group of 3 amino acids: valine, leucine, and isoleucine. In case you forgot, amino acids are the building blocks of protein. There are 20 of them, 9 of which are deemed essential. Essential amino acids cannot be made by the body and must come from food like beef, chickpeas, and eggs. 

chocolate protein powder

The point here is that BCAAs are in most of the foods that we eat, not just in protein powders. To say that protein powder, because it contains BCAAs, causes depression is therefore absurd. If BCAAs were really the issue, then all dietary protein sources would make us depressed.

The third reason why it is absurd to use this study to talk about human depression is that the study in question mentions depression only once – “Indeed, reduced plasma ratios of Trp relative to the other large neutral amino acids (Trp ratio) have been associated with depression and obesity.” Here, the researchers are referring to existing literature on the association between low levels of Tryptophan (Trp), an amino acid, and depression in humans. They are not referring to their own findings. Although they did find that increased ingestion of BCAAs lowers brain Trp uptake in mice, they are talking about mice, not humans. Using this quotation, which is only an afterthought, as evidence that protein powder causes depression in humans is therefore absurd. 

Protein powder does NOT make you depressed. There is absolutely no evidence that suggests otherwise. Some protein powders do contain ingredients that are not good for you, but these ingredients will only mess with your gut, not your head. If you want a protein powder that is made with safe, simple ingredients, try ours. We guarantee that it will make you feel great. 

Again, if you are looking for a new protein powder, try drink wholesome. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

Protein powder does not cause depression.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Non Artificial Protein Powder

What is the best non artificial protein powder?

drink wholesome is the best non artificial protein powder. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

drink wholesome is the best non artificial protein powder.

When most people think of artificial ingredients in protein powder, they think of artificial sweeteners like sucralose. Although sweeteners are the most common artificial ingredients in protein powder, they are not the only ones. Keep reading to learn more about the ingredients in your protein powder. 

What are artificial ingredients?

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), artificial ingredients cannot be found in nature and must be synthetically produced. This definition seems straightforward, but is complicated by the fact that many many artificial ingredients are molecularly identical to natural ingredients. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid), for example, may be derived from an orange or produced in a laboratory, and there is no way of knowing just by looking at the ingredient list. 

Natural ingredients, on the other hand, can be found in nature or derived from natural sources according to the FDA. Although seemingly straightforward, this definition gets blurry too. Let us use soy lecithin, a common ingredient in protein powder, as an example of why this is so.

Lecithin?

The FDA considers soy lecithin to be a natural ingredient because it comes from soybeans, but if you know anything about lecithin, you know that it looks nothing (physically or chemically) like a soybean. To make soy lecithin, soybean oil is extracted from raw soybeans using a chemical solvent (usually hexane). The solvent is then boiled off, leaving behind lecithins (a mixture of fats). Next, the lecithins are hydrated to form a sludge, which is then subjected to a process called desliming (yes, that is a technical term), in which the lecithins are placed in a centrifuge. During desliming, the lecithins are often treated with hydrogen peroxide to make them light in color. The last step this process is drying, at which time calcium may be added to make the final product more viscous. 

Now that you know how soy lecithin is made, how can you possibly say that both soybeans and soy lecithin are natural? It makes no sense. One looks like a plant, and the other looks like a science experiment. 

Natural flavor?

Another great example of the ambiguity of FDA language is the term ‘natural flavor.’ A natural flavor is more or less a catch-all term for everything that a manufacturer would rather not spell out on the ingredient list. While food manufacturers are required to disclose their ingredients, natural flavor manufacturers are not. They can add solvents, preservatives, emulsifiers, carriers, and other additives to a flavor that qualifies as ‘natural’ under current regulations. The FDA should therefore reconsider what it defines as natural because the current language is way too ambiguous, allowing for deceptive manufacturing practices. 

Here is the FDA definition of ‘natural flavor’: 

The term natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional. 

Is it just me, or does this definition ^ scream UNNATURAL! As you might imagine, many flavors, although technically ‘natural’ by FDA standards, are far removed from anything that you can find in nature. 

This might be somewhat presumptuous of me, but I am going to say that most of the ingredients in your average protein powder are artificial. Take a look at the two ingredient lists below: 

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

We can all agree that Artificial Flavor, Yellow 5, and Sucralose are artificial, but what about corn syrup solids? The FDA would say that it comes from corn, so it is natural, but this seems like a stretch to me. Corn syrup is made by mixing refined corn starch with a weak solution of hydrochloric acid and heating it under pressure. This process, called hydrolysis, breaks down the starch molecules into sugar. The final product is therefore something that looks nothing like corn.

Sucralose, on the other hand, is made by taking table sugar and replacing three hydrogen-oxygen groups with chlorine atoms. Is this process radically different than that of making corn syrup? In both cases we start with a simple carbohydrate, and convert it into something new. Sucralose and corn syrup are certainly different, but are they so different that one product should be classified as natural and the other artificial? Where do we draw the line?

If I had it my way, I would draw the line at the farm. If you cannot find an ingredient in nature, it is artificial, or man-made. Corn syrup is therefore artificial, and so are most of the ingredients in the ingredient list ^ above. If you want a truly natural protein powder, pick one made with real foods like egg whites, coconut, cocoa, and monk fruit.

chocolate protein powder

Here is a list of common protein powder ingredients that I would NOT classify as natural:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

I would like to add protein concentrates and isolates to this list. Protein concentrates and isolates – foods stripped of everything but the protein – are in most protein powders. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

I will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The problem with ingredients that look nothing like real food is that they tend to be hard to digest, and therefore sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders. This alone should be a good reason to avoid heavily-processed ingredients, regardless of whether or not they are technically natural.

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best non artificial protein powder. It is made with stomach and gut-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself. 

drink wholesome is the best natural protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Coconut Protein Powder

What is the best coconut protein powder?

drink wholesome is the best coconut protein powder. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

drink wholesome is the best coconut protein powder.

As you can see, drink wholesome is made with coconut. Although egg whites and chickpeas are the primary sources of protein, coconut is a key ingredient that contributes to the flavor, texture, and nutritional value of our protein powders.

Does it taste like coconut? 

Our vanilla protein powder has a strong coconut flavor. Our other flavored protein powders have a mild coconut aftertaste.

Why coconut? 

Again, all of our flavored protein powders contain coconut. We use coconut for several reasons. First of all, we love the flavor. Coconut adds a natural sweetness to our protein powders that is much better than the fake sweetness of artificial sweeteners and stevia. Second, over 50% of the fats in coconut are medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are celebrated for their health benefits. Finally, the healthy fats in coconut allow us to make smooth, creamy protein shakes without using food additives. Most companies have to use additives like sunflower lecithin and xanthan gum to make their shakes taste good. 

drink wholesome protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Many food additives are hard to digest and sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders.

Keep an eye out for artificial sweeteners too. Artificial sweeteners are poorly absorbed by the gut, which means that they feed your hungry gut bacteria. They also alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious GI problems and widespread inflammation.

Finally, artificial sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, can cause diarrhea because they draw water into your gut. Now you might finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey can casein are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production. They are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

chocolate protein powder
vegan chocolate protein powder supplement

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our chickpea protein powder. We like chickpeas because, compared to other plant protein sources, they are high in soluble fiber. Unlike insoluble fiber, which can have a laxative effect, soluble fiber increases in size as it moves through your digestive tract. This can help make your bowel movements easier and more regular

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best coconut protein powder. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself. 

drink wholesome is the best coconut flavored protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

Pre Workout Vs Protein Powder

Pre-workout vs protein powder?

Pre-workout vs protein powder? Learn more about each of these products and how they can help you achieve you wellness goals.

pre workout vs protein powder
protein powder for beginners

Pre-workout vs protein powder.

Is pre-workout the same as protein powder? 

No, pre-workout is not the same as protein powder. These are two different products, designed for different purposes. 

What is the difference between pre-workout and protein powder? 

A pre-workout is a product, usually a powdered drink mix, that boosts energy, focus, and performance during a workout. It is generally taken before the workout, although some people take pre-workout while exercising. Every brand of pre-workout is different, meaning that it contains different ingredients in different doses. Common pre-workout ingredients include beta-alanine, caffeine, citrulline, tyrosine, taurine, and creatine. Most pre-workouts contain little to no protein. 

Protein powder, on the other hand, is a protein supplement in powder form. It is used to increase dietary protein intake, and common types include egg white, pea, and whey. The most common way to use protein powder is to mix it with cold milk or water and make a protein shake, but it can also be added to oatmeal, smoothies, and other recipes. People like using protein powder because it is an easy way to add protein to their diet, and they usually consume it after a workout. 

So, if you are looking for more energy or focus during a workout, then pre-workout is the product for you. If you are looking for an easy way to boost your protein intake, go with protein powder.

Do I need protein powder? pre-workout? 

There are many reasons why people want to eat more protein, but most people start using protein supplements because they cannot easily get enough protein from real food. Now what constitutes ‘enough’ protein is different for everyone, and what is easy for one person may not be easy for the next. For this reason, the decision to start using protein supplements should be yours and yours alone. Most people can get more than enough protein from sources like eggs, fish, and legumes, but a protein supplement might be helpful if you do not have time to cook, or if you have trouble digesting regular food.  

You absolutely do not need pre-workout. You can have a great workout without it, and if you are feeling lethargic, start with a cup of coffee. Many pre-workout are full of heavily-processed, artificial ingredients that are not good for you, so they should be used as a ‘last resort.’ We are not in the business of making pre-workout, however, so I suggest that you consult this study if you are interested in learning more? 

In the market for a protein powder? 

There are many different types of protein powder, and any of them can help you boost your protein intake. Not all protein powders are created equal, however, and some of them contain ingredients that you do not want in your body. Here are some of the top ingredients to avoid.

drink wholesome protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Many food additives are hard to digest and sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders.

Keep an eye out for artificial sweeteners too. Artificial sweeteners are poorly absorbed by the gut, which means that they feed your hungry gut bacteria. They also alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious GI problems and widespread inflammation.

Finally, artificial sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, can cause diarrhea because they draw water into your gut. Now you might finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey can casein are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production. They are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

chocolate protein powder
vegan chocolate protein powder supplement

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our chickpea protein powder. We like chickpeas because, compared to other plant protein sources, they are high in soluble fiber. Unlike insoluble fiber, which can have a laxative effect, soluble fiber increases in size as it moves through your digestive tract. This can help make your bowel movements easier and more regular

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Pre-workout vs protein powder? These are two different products, designed for different purposes. If you are looking for more energy or focus during a workout, then pre-workout is the product for you. If you are looking for an easy way to boost your protein intake, go with protein powder.

Protein powder vs pre-workout.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Climbing Protein Powder

What is the best climbing protein powder?

drink wholesome is the best climbing protein powder. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

drink wholesome is the best climbing protein powder.

Should climbers use protein powder?

Many climbers do not consume enough protein, which can have a serious negative impact on their performance. If you do not get enough protein when training hard, your body will break down muscle for use as fuel. This will eventually make you weaker, no matter who you are. Protein powders are therefore a great way to ensure that you are getting the nutrition you need to recover and perform at your best.

It is important to note that protein powder is by no means necessary for improved performance. It is, however, a convenient way to boost your protein intake. Imagine, for example, that you are rushing to work after a morning workout. Making and drinking a protein shake is much easier than cooking and eating a meal.

If you have ever looked into buying protein powder, you know that there are an overwhelming number of options. Although most protein powders will give you enough protein, not all protein powders are good for you. This is to say that the type of protein powder is not particularly important, but the ingredients in that protein powder are. Here are a few ingredients to avoid when buying protein powder.

drink wholesome protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Many food additives are hard to digest and sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders.

Keep an eye out for artificial sweeteners too. Artificial sweeteners are poorly absorbed by the gut, which means that they feed your hungry gut bacteria. They also alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious GI problems and widespread inflammation.

Finally, artificial sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, can cause diarrhea because they draw water into your gut. Now you might finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey can casein are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production. They are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

chocolate protein powder
vegan chocolate protein powder supplement

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our chickpea protein powder. We like chickpeas because, compared to other plant protein sources, they are high in soluble fiber. Unlike insoluble fiber, which can have a laxative effect, soluble fiber increases in size as it moves through your digestive tract. This can help make your bowel movements easier and more regular

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best protein powder for climbers. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself. 

drink wholesome is the protein powder for climbing. 


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Protein Powder For Swimmers

What is the best protein powder for swimmers?

drink wholesome is the best protein powder for swimmers. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

drink wholesome is the best protein powder for swimmers.

Should competitive swimmers use protein powder?

Many swimmers do not consume enough protein, which can have a serious negative impact on their performance. If you do not get enough protein when training hard, your body will break down muscle for use as fuel. This will eventually make you slower, no matter who you are. Protein powders are therefore a great way to ensure that you are getting the nutrition you need to recover and perform at your best.

It is important to note that protein powder is by no means necessary for improved performance. It is, however, a convenient way to boost your protein intake. Imagine, for example, that you are rushing to work after a morning workout. Making and drinking a protein shake is much easier than cooking and eating a meal.

If you have ever looked into buying protein powder, you know that there are an overwhelming number of options. Although most protein powders will give you enough protein, not all protein powders are good for you. This is to say that the type of protein powder is not particularly important, but the ingredients in that protein powder are. Here are a few ingredients to avoid when buying protein powder.

drink wholesome protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Many food additives are hard to digest and sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders.

Keep an eye out for artificial sweeteners too. Artificial sweeteners are poorly absorbed by the gut, which means that they feed your hungry gut bacteria. They also alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious GI problems and widespread inflammation.

Finally, artificial sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, can cause diarrhea because they draw water into your gut. Now you might finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey can casein are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production. They are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

chocolate protein powder
vegan chocolate protein powder supplement

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our chickpea protein powder. We like chickpeas because, compared to other plant protein sources, they are high in soluble fiber. Unlike insoluble fiber, which can have a laxative effect, soluble fiber increases in size as it moves through your digestive tract. This can help make your bowel movements easier and more regular

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best protein powder for swimmers. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself. 

drink wholesome is the best swimming protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best CrossFit Protein Powder

What is the best CrossFit protein powder?

drink wholesome is the best CrossFit protein powder. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

drink wholesome is the best protein powder for CrossFit athletes.

Should CrossFit athletes use protein powder?

Many CrossFit athletes do not consume enough protein, which can have a serious negative impact on their performance. If you do not get enough protein when training hard, your body will break down muscle for use as fuel. This will eventually make you weaker, no matter who you are. Protein powders are therefore a great way to ensure that you are getting the nutrition you need to recover and perform at your best.

It is important to note that protein powder is by no means necessary for improved performance. It is, however, a convenient way to boost your protein intake. Imagine, for example, that you are rushing to work after a morning workout. Making and drinking a protein shake is much easier than cooking and eating a meal.

If you have ever looked into buying protein powder, you know that there are an overwhelming number of options. Although most protein powders will give you enough protein, not all protein powders are good for you. This is to say that the type of protein powder is not particularly important, but the ingredients in that protein powder are. Here are a few ingredients to avoid when buying protein powder.

drink wholesome protein powder

Avoid food additives.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Many food additives are hard to digest and sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders.

Keep an eye out for artificial sweeteners too. Artificial sweeteners are poorly absorbed by the gut, which means that they feed your hungry gut bacteria. They also alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious GI problems and widespread inflammation.

Finally, artificial sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, can cause diarrhea because they draw water into your gut. Now you might finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce. Food additives are not the only thing to look out for when buying protein powder, however. There are several other ingredients that can upset your stomach.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey can casein are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production. They are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

chocolate protein powder
vegan chocolate protein powder supplement

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our chickpea protein powder. We like chickpeas because, compared to other plant protein sources, they are high in soluble fiber. Unlike insoluble fiber, which can have a laxative effect, soluble fiber increases in size as it moves through your digestive tract. This can help make your bowel movements easier and more regular

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome is the best CrossFit protein powder. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself. If you are paleo, as many CrossFitters are, you will be happy to learn that we make paleo-friendly options

drink wholesome is the best protein powder for CrossFit athletes.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

The Best Egg White Protein Powder For Weight Loss

What is the best egg white protein powder for weight loss?

drink wholesome is the best egg white protein powder for weight loss. It is made with stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
SALE
Out of stock
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

drink wholesome is the best egg white protein powder for weight loss.

Protein helps with weight loss.

In theory, losing weight is simple. All you have to do is maintain a calorie deficit – eat fewer calories than you burn. Anyone who has tried to lose weight, however, will tell you that doing so is much easier said than done. 

Hunger is a powerful sensation, and depriving your body of calories it thinks it needs is uncomfortable. Your body does not like to be uncomfortable, and it will not shut up until you give it what it wants. In this case, it wants food, which is the main reason why losing weight is so hard. Even the most stubborn person can only fight hunger for so long, and will eventually eat (often more than he or she needs to). 

The secret to weight loss is therefore to prevent hunger. In order to do so while maintaining a calorie deficit, you have to eat the right foods. Some foods are satiating, meaning they fill you up. Others are not. The trick is to eat more of the former, and less of the latter. 

High protein foods are among the most satiating foods and help with weight loss. They keep you feeling full for longer, which helps prevent cravings and overeating. In other words, increasing the percentage of your calories that come from high protein foods will help you lose weight. 

You should aim to get most of your protein from normal foods like eggs, fish, legumes, meat, and nuts. Getting enough protein this way can be challenging for some people, however, which is where protein powder comes in handy. 

Boosting your protein intake with protein powder is easy for a few reasons. First of all, protein powder can be added to smoothies and recipes. Protein powder can also be mixed with milk or water to make a quick protein shake. Protein shakes are great for people who have trouble swallowing, people with sensitive stomachs, and people who need a convenient meal or snack.

Any type of protein can help you achieve your nutritional goals, but if you are reading this article, you have already chosen egg white protein powder. This was a great choice. Dried egg whites are nature’s protein powder, and are one of the best sources of protein out there. Not all egg white protein powders are good for you, however, and if you want an egg white protein powder that will help you lose weight without causing side effects, you have come to the right place.

chocolate protein powder
unflavored protein powder

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Why drink wholesome

First of all, drink wholesome is made with whole egg whites. Many unflavored egg white protein powders, in contrast, are made with protein isolates. We won’t go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for some people. 

Instead of protein concentrates and isolates, we use whole eggs whites that are simply pasteurized and dried before becoming protein powder. They have a natural aftertaste free from the saltiness and sulfur “eggy” notes typical of eggs because they are broken less than twenty-four hours from when they were laid. Most eggs, on the other hand, sit for days, sometimes weeks before being processed. As a result, they begin to decay and release a chemical called hydrogen sulfide, which has a potent sulfur odor. 

Taste matters because protein powder is just food. If drinking a protein shake is a chore, it’s not sustainable in the long term. A diet is not a six-week affair, it’s for life.

drink wholesome protein powder

Second, drink wholesome is additive-free. Many egg white protein powders, in contrast, are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Most protein powders are full of food additives. Although they are not necessarily bad for you in small quantities, food additives can add up quickly, especially if you drink a protein shake every day. At higher quantities, food additives can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

Many food additives are hard to digest and sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to ferment (eat), and as they eat, these bacteria produce gas, which causes bloating, cramps, and nausea.

In the short term, gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. In the long term, food additives disrupt regulatory pathways in the intestine and trigger the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and systemic inflammatory disorders.

Keep an eye out for artificial sweeteners too. Artificial sweeteners are poorly absorbed by the gut, which his means that they feed your hungry gut bacteria. They also alter the composition of your gut microbiota (the collection of microorganisms that help you digest food). This can lead to serious GI problems and widespread inflammation.

Finally, artificial sweeteners, especially sugar alcohols like xylitol, can cause diarrhea because they draw water into your gut. Now you might finally have something to blame for those post-protein shake trips to the bathroom. 

Here is a list of the most common food additives in protein powder:

acacia gum, acesulfame potassium, artificial flavors, aspartame, carrageenan, cellulose gum, dextrin, dextrose, erythritol, gellan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, inulin, locust bean gum, “natural” flavors*, maltodextrin, rice syrup solids, soy lecithin, silica, sucralose, sunflower lecithin, xanthan gum, xylitol

When it comes to identifying food additives, go with your gut. 😉 As a rule of thumb, they are the ingredients that you cannot pronounce.

our ingredients: 

egg whites, coconut, cocoa, monk fruit

the alternative:

Protein Matrix Comprised of (Whey Protein Concentrate,  Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumen, Glutamine Peptides), Polydextrose, Sunflower Creamer (Sunflower Oil, Corn Syrup Solids,  Sodium Caseinate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Dipotassium Phosphate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Soy Lecithin, Tocopherols), Natural and Artificial Flavor, MCT Powder (Medium Chain Triglycerides, Nonfat Dry Milk, Disodium Phosphate, Silicon Dioxide), Lecithin, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Yellow 5, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Papain, Bromelain.

*This is the actual ingredient list of one of the best-selling protein powders in the United States.

Avoid dairy. 

Dairy-based proteins like whey can casein are byproducts of cheese and yogurt production. They are known to cause digestive issues, especially for people with lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Over one in three Americans are lactose intolerant, and the prevalence of IBS is somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the United States. It follows that you may be lactose intolerant or have IBS and not even know it.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood condition, and it is unclear why dairy triggers symptoms. Lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is clearly understood. People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest lactose, the sugar in dairy. As you just learned, partially digested food feeds the bacteria in your gut, which produce gas. 

Avoid protein concentrates and isolates.

Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder is hard. Finding an additive-free, dairy-free protein powder made with real foods is next to impossible. Why? Most protein powders are made with protein concentrates and isolates, foods stripped of everything but the protein. They are listed on the ingredient list as “pea protein,” for example, as opposed to “peas.”

We will not go into the details, but protein concentrates and isolates undergo heavy mechanical and chemical processing before becoming protein powder. Sometimes, manufacturers use chemical solvents like hexane to separate the protein from the food. This means that what you end up putting into your body looks nothing like real food. 

The potential problem here is that your gut might not know what to do with ingredients like these. Your gut prefers the real thing, not some heavily-processed imitation, so protein concentrates and isolates might be hard to digest for people with sensitive stomachs.

chocolate protein powder
vegan chocolate protein powder supplement

Instead of protein concentrates or isolates, we use egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these are easy to digest and a stomach-friendly alternative to protein concentrates and isolates.  

Unless you have a sensitivity or allergy to eggs, egg white protein is the best protein for people with sensitive stomachs. Egg whites are low in fiber, low-FODMAP, and have the highest protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of any whole food. Our customers have experienced fewer digestive issues with egg white protein than with any other type of protein. 

If you cannot eat eggs, try our chickpea protein powder. We like chickpeas because, compared to other plant protein sources, they are high in soluble fiber. Unlike insoluble fiber, which can have a laxative effect, soluble fiber increases in size as it moves through your digestive tract. This can help make your bowel movements easier and more regular

★★★★★

“I just finished my first bag and ordered 2 more! I Iove this stuff! I have IBS and every protein powder hurts my stomach…except drink wholesome!”

-Julio

Again, drink wholesome makes the best egg white protein powder for weight loss. We make flavored and unflavored egg white protein powders, so there is something for everyone. Order samples to see for yourself.

drink wholesome is the best egg white protein powder for weight loss.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

Can You Freeze Protein Powder?

Can you freeze protein powder?

Can you freeze protein powder? Yes, you can freeze protein powder. Here is how to extend the shelf-life of your protein supplement. 

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

Freezing protein powder is easy!

Although protein powder has a long shelf life, it will become rancid eventually. If you have a container of protein powder that you want to keep, but do not anticipate using anytime soon, you can freeze it.

The colder and darker the storage environment, the better protein powder will keep. Freezer storage is therefore ideal. For the best results, place flour as far away from the freezer door as possible. This will prevent incidental light and warmth exposure.

How to freeze protein powder?

Freezing protein powder is simple. All you have to do is put the powder in an airtight container and place the container in the freezer. A large, sealable plastic bag or a snap-top plastic container will work if the original packaging is damaged.

Using an airtight container is important because protein powder exposed to moisture will spoil. Using an airtight container helps prevent the protein powder from absorbing flavors and odors from surrounding foods.

If you are storing your protein powder in a bag, try to remove as much of the air from the bag as possible before freezing. Doing so will extend your shelf life even further.

Do not combine new and old containers of protein powder before freezing. This shortens the shelf life of the newer protein powder.

Expect to extend the shelf life of your protein powder by at least six months by storing it in the freezer. I have frozen protein powder for over two years with no issues whatsoever.

How to unfreeze protein powder?

Defrosting protein powder is easy. When stored properly, frozen protein powder can be scooped right out of the freezer. If you plan on refreezing the protein powder after using some, do so immediately to prevent condensation.

Looking for a new protein powder? Try drink wholesome. It is made with delicious stomach-friendly real foods. Order samples to see for yourself.

Freezing protein powder is easy!


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

Protein Powder Won’t Mix

Protein powder won’t mix? 

Protein powder won’t mix? Here are 5 tips to make a smooth, creamy protein shake every time.

$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%
$29.99 or subscribe and save 10%

How to mix protein powder.

Why doesn’t my protein powder dissolve?

Before we get into how to make your protein powder mix better, it is important to acknowledge that being hard to mix, although annoying, might be a good thing. 

Whereas most protein powders made with are heavily-processed protein concentrates and isolates, some protein powders are made with minimally-processed, naturally protein-rich ingredients. Our protein powders, for example, are made with egg whites and chickpeas. Egg whites are simply broken, pasteurized, and dried before becoming protein powder. Chickpeas are just dried and ground. Minimally-processed ingredients like these still contain fats, carbohydrates, and fiber, all of which decrease their solubility (ability to dissolve). A plant-based protein like peas, for example, contains lots of insoluble fiber. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in liquid, and if it is not stripped away before the plant becomes protein powder, the protein powder will be hard to mix.

The solubility of plant-based ingredients affects animal-based protein powders too. Chocolate flavored whey protein powders, for example, contain cocoa powder, a derivative of cocoa beans. Cocoa powder, depending on how it is processed, can make protein powder hard to mix. Raw cocoa powder, for instance, is not very soluble. Alkalized (Dutch) protein powder, on the other hand, dissolves more easily because it undergoes more processing (an alkaline solution like potassium carbonate is added to the chocolate liquor).

Minimally-processed proteins are also harder to mix because they have a larger particle size than protein concentrates and isolates. Large particles have a smaller specific surface area (surface area ÷ mass) than small particles, and therefore take longer to dissolve. Think about how long it would take to dissolve a sugar cube in water versus how long it would take to dissolve and an equal amount of granular sugar. A sugar cube would dissolve slower because the combined surface area of all of the sugar granules is much greater than the surface area of the sugar cube. More surface area means more contact with the water molecules, which allows the granular sugar to dissolve more quickly.

Finally, most protein powders companies use food additives to increase mix-ability. The problem with food additives, protein isolates, and other processed ingredients is that your stomach can tell the difference between real food and an imitation. Processed ingredients can resist digestion, meaning they sit in your gut for longer than they should. This gives your gut bacteria more time to eat, and as they eat, gut bacteria produce gas, which can cause bloating and stomach pain. Gas also slows colonic transit (the amount of time it takes food to travel through the colon), which can lead to constipation. 

Protein powder that is hard to mix might be better for you than protein powder that mixes easily, especially if you have a sensitive stomach. Using a blender or shaking a little longer is therefore a small price to pay for a protein powder that will not cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects.

If you are using a minimally-processed protein powder like drink wholesome, and are having a hard time mixing it in liquid, here are a few tips.

5 ways to make protein powder mix better: 

1. Use a blender. A blender is hands down the best way to make a protein shake, especially if you want to add ice or ingredients like fresh fruit or yogurt. Most blenders make quick work of clumps so you can make a creamy protein shake every time. 

2. Use a shaker bottle. A shaker bottle – is a plastic bottle with a small metal whisk inside. The whisk helps to break up the clumps of protein powder as you shake. Shakers are considered by many to be an essential for making a protein shake on-the-go. 

3. Use a water bottle or travel coffee mug with a tight fitting lid. Add the protein powder, your liquid of choice, and a handful of ice cubes. The ice cubes will act like a whisk and help to break up the clumps of powder as you shake. 

4. Mix the protein powder in a small mixing bowl using a balloon whisk. Keep in mind that the warmer the liquid is, the easier it will be to dissolve the protein powder. You can always add ice cubes later if you prefer a cold protein shake. 

5. If you only have a glass and spoon, add the protein powder slowly, stirring constantly. Wait until each spoonful is completely dissolved before adding another. 

Our protein powder, because it is minimally-processed and additive-free, is not the easiest to mix. We therefore recommend using a blender to make a protein shake. Keep in mind that you can also add protein powder to oat meal, yogurt, and other recipes if you are sick of protein shakes. 

How to mix protein powder.


Hi, my name is Jack. I created drink wholesome because I was sick of protein powders that upset my stomach. drink wholesome is handmade in Plymouth, MA. 

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.